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William DAY [490]
(1776-1840)
Mary [491]
(1773-1847)
James PIKE [3140]
(Cir 1766-1843)
Rachel TUFFIN [5820]
(Cir 1769-Abt 1845)
George DAY [472]
(1804-1878)
Harriet PIKE [473]
(1808-1883)
John DAY [557]
(1849-1907)

 

Family Links

Spouses/Children:
1. Unknown [1528]

2. Mary(Minnie) JONES [777]

John DAY [557]

  • Born: 1849, Semley, Wiltshire, England 1 2
  • Christened: 22 Jul 1849, Semley, Wiltshire, England 3 4
  • Marriage (1): Unknown [1528]
  • Marriage (2): Mary(Minnie) JONES [777] on 19 Dec 1880 in Aberdare, , Glamorgan, Wales
  • Died: 1907, Tylorstown, Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales aged 58 1 2
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bullet  General Notes:

John was married before and had Harriet in 1876.(possibly Merthyr Tydfil 11a page 517 June) He possibly had 2 other children before marrying Mary.Living with parents in 1861 and 1871

1861 living at Olivers Farm, Semley next to James and Elizabeth Pike(farmer of 140 Acres employing 4 men and 2 boys)
George Day Ag Lab, abt 1805 Semley, Wiltshire, England Head Semley Wiltshire
Harriett Day abt 1811 Semley, Wiltshire, England Wife Semley
Henry Day abt 1846 Semley. Wiltshire, England Son Semley
John Day, Ag Lab, abt 1850 Semley, Wiltshire, England Son Semley
Mary Janes Day abt 1852 Semley, Wiltshire, England Daughter Semley
Mary Tanswele abt 1826 Norwich, Norfolk, England Lodger Semley

1881 lived at41 Glamorgan Street, Aberdare John Day, b. 1849,Head,Wiltshire, Coalminer
Mary Day, 1852, Cardiganshire, Wife
Harriet Day, 1876, Daughter, Glamorgan
Sarah A Beynon Stepdaughter b.1876,Glamorgan
William J Beynon b. 1874, Stepson Glamorgan

1891 living at 12 East Road, Tylorstown,Ystradyfodwyg, All except John senior, who spoke only English, they spoke both Welsh and English
John Day, b. 1849,Head,Wiltshire, Coal miner
Mary Day, 1852, Cardiganshire, Wife
Sarah A Beynon stepdaughter b.1876,Aberammon Glamorgan
William J Beynon b. 1874, stepson, Aberammon Glamorgan
John Henry Day b.1882, Aberammon, Glamorgan
George Alfred Day, 1883, Tylorstown
Morgan James Day, 1884, Tylorstown
Mary Sephora Day, 1886, Tylorstown
David Washington Day, b 1888, Tylorstown
Robert Sleeman, 1862, Devon, Lodger, Mason

1901 Living at 12 East Road, Tylorstown,Ystrafodwyg
John Day abt 1851 Semley, Wiltshire, England, Head , Coalminer(Hewer)
Morgan Day abt 1884 Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales Son, Coal miner (Hewer)
Mary Day abt 1886 Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales Daughter
David Day abt 1888 Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales Son Assistant Coal miner
Margaret J Day abt 1894 Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales Daughter
Rosie Day abt 1895 Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales Daughter

Buried in the family plot in Treorchy

Had a neice called Edith Burr. Lived in Bristol and set up the Nursing Home with Auntie May in Hampton Park. Als related are the Blacks in Semley.

Tylorstown
Tylorstown is named after Alfred Tylor a Londoner who purchased the mineral rights of Pendyrus farm in 1872 and sunk the first colliery in the village, also called Pendyrus. In common with the majority of the valley at that time the 1847 tithe map shows only scattered farmhouses, meadows, fields and vast tracks of Oak woods.

As stated the beginnings of mining in Tylorstown, and hence the beginnings of the village of Tylorstown itself date back to 1872. It was at this date that Alfred Tylor of Newgate Street, London purchased the mineral rights of Pendyrus Farm and began the second large colliery concern in the Rhondda Fach. However great difficulties were encountered in the sinking of this first pit and thus it was not until 1876 that the steam coal seams were reached, at a depth of 333 yards. The first steam coal was despatched via the Taff Vale Railway to Cardiff in 1877 and from then on the development of Pendyrys Colliery (as it was then known was extremely rapid, going from 3,252 tons in 1877 to 241,061 tons in 1893. David Davis and Sons Ltd. eventually purchased the Pendyrys Colliery in 1894. In common with many of the villages of the Rhondda the sudden influx of workers led to overcrowding, and poor housing conditions, with the first workers at Pendyrys Colliery housed in crudely constructed wooden huts. Initially only the bare minimum of community facilities were provided and as E.D. Lewis describes in his work, 'The Rhondda Valleys, '…in many of these hastily erected townships of the Rhondda in the early days of the 'coal rush', life bore a strong resemblance to the frontier townships of the United States.' The extent to which the workers of Tylorstown were tied to the local colliery is shown by the fact that in the early days even the water supply to houses in Tylorstown was entrusted to Tylor and Co. Tylorstown also had it share of tragedy when in 1896 an explosion killed 57 miners.



Tylorstown
Tylorstown is named after Alfred Tylor a Londoner who purchased the mineral rights of Pendyrus farm in 1872 and sunk the first colliery in the village, also called Pendyrus. In common with the majority of the valley at that time the 1847 tithe map shows only scattered farmhouses, meadows, fields and vast tracks of Oak woods.
As stated the beginnings of mining in Tylorstown, and hence the beginnings of the village of Tylorstown itself date back to 1872. It was at this date that Alfred Tylor of Newgate Street, London purchased the mineral rights of Pendyrus Farm and began the second large colliery concern in the Rhondda Fach. However great difficulties were encountered in the sinking of this first pit and thus it was not until 1876 that the steam coal seams were reached, at a depth of 333 yards. The first steam coal was despatched via the Taff Vale Railway to Cardiff in 1877 and from then on the development of Pendyrys Colliery (as it was then known was extremely rapid, going from 3,252 tons in 1877 to 241,061 tons in 1893. David Davis and Sons Ltd. eventually purchased the Pendyrys Colliery in 1894.
In common with many of the villages of the Rhondda the sudden influx of workers led to overcrowding, and poor housing conditions, with the first workers at Pendyrys Colliery housed in crudely constructed wooden huts. Initially only the bare minimum of community facilities were provided and as E.D. Lewis describes in his work, 'The Rhondda Valleys, '…in many of these hastily erected townships of the Rhondda in the early days of the 'coal rush', life bore a strong resemblance to the frontier townships of the United States.' The extent to which the workers of Tylorstown were tied to the local colliery is shown by the fact that in the early days even the water supply to houses in Tylorstown was entrusted to Tylor and Co. Tylorstown also had it share of tragedy when in 1896 an explosion killed 57 miners


The rate of development of Tylorstown is best illustrated by contrasting this image of a 'frontier town' of the 1870's with the description given of the town less than thirty years later in the 1906 Kelly's Industrial Directory.
Here the town is described as a 'hamlet 7 miles north-north-west from Pontypridd' it has its own train station on the Taff Vale Railway. It has its own church, 'The Holy Trinity' built in 1883 at a cost of £1,400,Post Offices and telegraph office, which was also open on a Sunday.
Left: Cynllwyn-Du Colliery Officials
The rate of development of Tylorstown is best illustrated by contrasting this image of a 'frontier town' of the 1870's with the description given of the town less than thirty years later in the 1906 Kelly's Industrial Directory.
Here the town is described as a 'hamlet 7 miles north-north-west from Pontypridd' it has its own train station on the Taff Vale Railway. It has its own church, 'The Holy Trinity' built in 1883 at a cost of £1,400,Post Offices and telegraph office, which was also open on a Sunday.

It had in total thirteen places of worship, conducting services in both English and Welsh, including English and Welsh Baptist, Calvinistic Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan. Commercially it boasted amongst others, a wine and spirit merchant, a boot warehouse, watch and clock maker, milk vendor, china dealer, fried fish dealers, drapers and outfitters, a branch of the London and Provincial Bank, Tylorstown band Musical Institute, Tylorstown Conservative Club and Institute, Tylorstown Library and Institute, as well as numerous general stores, butchers, grocers etc.
Thus Alfred Tylor and his successors had completely transformed an isolated, virtually unpopulated rural hamlet to a thriving mining township.

#690 number in baptism register 5

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bullet  Noted events in his life were:

1. Lived at: Cottage, 1851, Semley, Wiltshire, England. 6

2. Lived at: Oliver's Farm, 1861, Semley, Wiltshire, England. 2

3. Occupation: Labourer, 1861, Semley, Wiltshire, England. 2

4. Lived at: Hart Hill, 1871, Semley, Wiltshire, England.

5. Occupation: labourer, 1871, Hart Hill, Semley, Wiltshire, England. 1

6. Lived at: 17 East Road, 1891, Ystradfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales. 7

7. Occupation: Coal Miner, 1891, Ystradfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales. 7

8. Lived at: 12 East Road, 1901, Ystradfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales. 8

9. Occupation: Coal Miner, 1901, Ystradfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales. 8


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John married Unknown [1528] [MRIN: 514]. (Unknown [1528] died before 1880.)


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John next married Mary(Minnie) JONES [777] [MRIN: 330] on 19 Dec 1880 in Aberdare, , Glamorgan, Wales. (Mary(Minnie) JONES [777] was born in 1852 in Llangybi, , Cardigan, Wales, christened about 24 Jan 1852 and died on 27 Oct 1900 in Tylorstown, Ystradyfodwg, Glamorgan, Wales.)


bullet  Marriage Notes:

December Year: 1880 District: Merlhyr Tydfil County: Breconshire Glamorgan Mid Glamorgan Volume: 11a Page: 563
at St Elvan's Church in the parish of Aberdare. December 19th 1880. John Day a Widower and Mary Beynon a Widow. Both living in Aberaman. Witnesses were George and Eliza James(they made their "Mark") 5

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Sources


1 (1871 English and Welsh Census(London, TNA/Ancestry.co.uk, 1972) , Web site showing copies of original enumerator schedules), CEn 1871 rg10 1962 30 5.

2 (1861 English and Welsh Census(London, TNA/Ancestry.co.uk, 1962) , Web site showing copies of original enumerator schedules), CEN 1861 rg9 1320 page 4.

3 LDS, Semley 1239309.

4 IGI.

5 Correspondence (Email), COR Email Maggie Luscombe. Gedcom Provided Maggie Luscombe
To Contact Maggie - use the following: tnmluscombe at gmail.com (please remove spaces and place an @ where "at" is)
.

6 Published by Ancestry.co.uk (1851 English and Welsh Census(London, TNA/Ancestry.co.uk, 1952) , Web site showing copies of original enumerator schedules), CEN 1851 ho 107 1849 141 4.

7 (1891 English and Welsh Census(London, TNA/Ancestry.co.uk, 1992) , Web site showing copies of original enumerator schedules), CEN 1891 rg12 4429 29 3.

8 (1901 English and Welsh Census(London, TNA/Ancestry.co.uk, 2002) , Web site showing copies of original enumerator schedules), CEN 1901 rg 13 5019 105 3.


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